Abyssinian Cat Personality
|

THE ABYSSINIAN CAT PERSONALITY AND BREED (ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW)

Would you like to know more about the Abyssinian cat personality? Intelligent, affectionate, and adaptable, he is an excellent companion. This elegant and charming cat has a short-haired coat and requires minimal brushing.

The Abyssinians settle down without problems in a family context and do not suffer from the presence of children or dogs.

At a glance, the Abyssinian is an affectionate and social cat by nature; it gets along well with humans, has a ticked tabby variant, and is available in a wide range of colors.

Let’s know more about the Abyssinian cat.

THE ABYSSINIAN CAT PERSONALITY AND BREED (ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW)

WHAT IS THE ABYSSINIAN CAT GENERAL ASPECT AND SIZE?

Abyssinian cats are gorgeous, not only outside but also inside. They are playful, thoughtful, loving cats that look great and even have an eye contour. Agile and flexible, the Abyssinian stands out for feral elegance and lively character.

This cat would never get away from his master, who knows how to entertain others with amazing acrobatic performances.

The Abyssinian has thin and delicate legs and paws related to the rest of the body, and the black inner eyelid highlights the eyes.

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE ABYSSINIAN CAT

CharacteristicDescriptionNotes
In summaryReproduced in an
ever-increasing wide
range of colors.
Kittens are easy enough
to find.
Usually, the litter
is small in size
PersonalityPlayful, but not
too loud
AppearanceRather exotic,
especially if it has tufts
in the ears
In the houseHe knows how
to settle in, showing
himself as affectionate
and a lover of the house
BehaviorGood pet, both for
single people and
families
He usually gets along
well with dogs,
but one can never tell
with little animals
or birds
GroomingSmooth coat. To stay
in order, it does not need
to be brushed too much
Most common health
problems
Predisposed to
Feline Leukemia (FeLV)
Vaccination essential
to protect them
from this lethal
infection
SizeMedium, between
4 and 7.5 kg
EarsWide, distant, and pointed
EyesLarge and
almond-shaped,
amber, hazelnut
or green
HeadRound and slightly
wedge-shaped;
medium length nose
PawsLong, slender,
and with small bones
CoatSoft and shiny,
but at the same time
consistent and
dense to the touch
Allowed colorsHare, sorrel (copper red),
blue, fawn (light fawn),
lilac, silver, silver sorrel
(siver-peach copper)
and silver blue

WHAT IS THE HISTORY OF THE ABYSSINIAN?

The name of this breed derives from the old name of Ethiopia, Abyssinia.

Reportedly a British Army soldier was responsible for bringing in Europe the first specimen, named Zula. But, in actual fact, it is thought that these cats’ proper place of origin is further north, in Egypt.

The next stage of development occurred in England, so much so that the breed had its own representative in one of the first feline performances, held in 1871 at the Crystal Palace, near London.

In this phase, the Abyssinians had-still brindle stripes on the legs, which were eliminated from the breeding selection. Back then, prominent ears tufts were undoubtedly more common, emphasizing its exotic appearance.

ABYSSINIAN BREED DEVELOPMENT

The traditional color of this breed in Great Britain is still defined “usual” (ordinary), while in the United States, we speak of ruddy (reddish). It is a rich shade between golden and brown, with a reddish undercoat and a distinct black ticking.

The Abyssinian was created with a wide range of new colors, including blue, fawn, chocolate, and lilac, without forgetting the corresponding silver variants, such as blue-silver.

In the past, the Abyssinians suffered greatly from the feline leukemia virus, but today, fortunately, the vaccine is available. Like every other cat, members of this breed should be protected from a potentially lethal disease against which there is no cure.

WHY IS THE ABYSSINIAN A TALENTED CAT?

The Abyssinian is considered one of the most talented breeds. The reasons for this cat’s talent and ability are traced back to its history.

The Abyssinian has developed an intelligent and receptive personality thanks to the contribution of different breeds involved in the breeding program.

It descends from a single specimen, and later on, other crosses were introduced to maintain the typical ticked tabby color of the mantle.

Through careful selection, the breeders have succeeded in eliminating the streaks on the legs, a characteristic associated with similar breeds; that’s why the Abyssinian looks so unique.

Another peculiar and much-sought characteristic is the tufts of hair on the ears, which give the Abyssinian an exotic and original look. However, now they are less evident than in the past, perhaps due to hybridizations that have resulted in the development of other colors.

THE ABYSSINIAN CATS AND SKILL GAMES

Despite being a relatively quiet cat, the Abyssinian is very receptive. He loves man’s company and can even be trained to chase and return a ball.

A wooden floor is ideal because the ball will slide freely on the surface, encouraging him to follow and intercept it with his feet. In all likelihood, he will then learn how to
playing alone, thus keeping himself busy in your absence.

ORIGIN OF THE ABYSSINIAN CAT

Certainly among the oldest feline breeds, the origin of the Abyssinian is still quite controversial. The name does not mean the true native country but the one from which the cat was first imported.

▷ According to some legends, the pharaohs also revered the Abyssinian.

The Abyssinians arrived in Europe at the end of the Abyssinian War in 1968. It seems that the first cat of this species, named Zula, had been adopted by the wife of
captain Barrett-Lennard, who decided to take him with him to Great Brittany in those
years.

The cat was brought three years later at the exhibition held at the Crystal Palace in
The cat had considerable success in London, where it won the third prize thanks to its royal appearance and its exotic origins.

Even if the legend has it that this cat is the right descendant of the cats worshiped in ancient Egypt due to the substantial similarity with the cats depicted in papyrus and murals that portray a very similar feline to the Abyssinian, it is not the reality.

According to recent genetic studies, these felines would originate from the coasts of the Indian Ocean and some islands of the Asian Southeast.

After the success of Zula, in Great Britain, some breeders began to breed the Abyssinians, and the race obtained its official recognition in 1882.

ABYSSINIAN CAT PERSONALITY

Abyssinian Cat Personality


Hyperactive, intelligent, and highly attentive, the Abyssinian conquers above all for
the sweet temper and the particular musical meowing. He loves the company of young and old, other cats and dogs.

AN ADVICE
Quick and stealthy, the Abyssinian is capable of any acrobatics action to steal succulent morsels! So be careful never to leave steaks or fresh fish lying around.

In short, he is a friendly type, albeit a bit self-centered at times. It is perfect for apartment life, but the excessive liveliness leads him to make some trouble too much.

Very affectionate, he binds in particular with one person. He loves to walk and, in order not to give it up, he adapts quickly to walking on a leash. Despite his rebellious nature, the Abyssinian is not vindictive; he is proud but never arrogant and possesses a balanced character.

AN ADVICE
Remember never to separate a kitten from his mother before ninety days to avoid compromising its character.

These gorgeous cats love the company of humans and create a close bond with their owners, showing genuine affection. He is very playful, and if they have to share the house with a dog, they usually play and sleep with him, significantly if they grew up together.

▷ Firmness and patience are indispensable for managing its liveliness.

The extremely affectionate character makes it similar to a dog, such as being very attached to his master.

THE SPREAD OF THE ABYSSINIAN

The Abyssinian was introduced in the USA from Great Britain, where it is still prevalent. However, in Italy, its diffusion is minimal to specimens of hare and sorrel. Only recently, thanks to the passion of some breeders, new colors have been selected.

HOW TO CARE FOR AND FEED THE ABYSSINIAN CAT

The breed guarantees him a sturdy constitution by nature and his short-haired coat only needs a weekly pass with a damp woolen cloth to keep it shiny and clean.

The ideal diet for an Abyssinian cat must include fish and chicken, preferably boiled, supplemented with cooked vegetables and rice.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is the Abyssinian cat price?

The Abyssinian cats can cost between $500 and $2000. Unfortunately, the Abyssinian is rare to find and can be costly, although the price depends on the breed’s purity, the reader, and the cat’s age.


What is the Abyssinian cat’s lifespan?

The Abyssinian cat can live up to 15 years of age. The length of life depends on the quality of food, proper care, and the environment they live in.


Are Abyssinian cats aggressive?

Abyssinian cats are not aggressive; they are a sweet breed and perfect for families with children and other pets. They can have some moments of independence, but their temperament is gentle.


Are Abyssinian cats rare?

Abyssinian cats are pretty popular in the US, but it might be challenging to find them in other parts of the world.

Are Abyssinian cats cuddly?

Abyssinian cats are sweet and friendly but not necessarily cuddly. They follow their humans everywhere and love human interactions and interacting with other pets.


Are Abyssinian cats talkative?

Abyssinian cats have a soft meow; their vocalization is not intrusive but almost enjoyable. They are not loud and vocalize like any other cat if they want something.


Can Abyssinian cats be left alone?

Abyssinian cats cannot be left alone for a very long time; they are affectionate and need interaction with other people or pets. Furthermore, since they are lively, they need to play with others or have some form of entertainment.


Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

CommentLuv badge